Vans

Stopping Distances For Vans

The proper following distance for a van is leaving a four (4) second interval: this is longer than for car drivers; the ‘Total Stopping Distance’ is made up of

“The Perception Distance”

“The Reaction Distance” (average of ¾ second) and

“The Braking Distance”

When travelling at 55 mph, assuming average reaction time, your van will travel 55 feet from the time it takes you to move your foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal; then for adverse road or weather conditions, increase that distance by one more second.

It is suggested that whenever you feel you might have to brake, to move your foot off the accelerator and ‘cover’ the brake, ready to push it down if necessary. Vans, especially loaded ones, take longer to stop than do cars. Compared to a passenger car, a van’s following distance should be greater in both ideal and adverse conditions.

Built-up

Areas*

Elsewhere

Motorways

Single
carriage-ways

Dual
carriage-ways

Type of vehicle

MPH

MPH

MPH

MPH


Car derived vans
(including car derived vans up to 2 tonnes maximum laden weight)

30

60

70

70


Car derived vans towing caravans or trailers
(including car derived vans and motorcycles)

30

50

60

60


Goods vehicles
(not exceeding 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight)

30

50

60

70+


Goods vehicles
(exceeding 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight)

30

40

50

60

+ 60 if articulated or towing a trailer. Street lights usually mean that there is a 30 mph speed limit unless there are signs showing another limit.

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