Duty of care

A Safer Speed Policy Example

(Company Name And Logo)

 Safer Speed Policy

The facts:

1. Driving is the most dangerous work activity that most people do.

2.  One of the most significant risks is staff driving or riding at inappropriate speeds on work-related journeys. This includes both exceeding the speed limit and driving within the limit but still too fast for the conditions (for example, twisting rural roads, poor weather, poor visibility or high pedestrian activity).

3. At higher speeds, there is less time to identify and react to what is happening, it takes longer to stop and impacts are more severe, causing more serious injuries to vehicle occupants and others.

4. Higher speeds also magnify other driver errors, such as close-following or driving when tired or distracted, thus multiplying the chances of causing a crash.

5. Drivers who ‘speed’ crash more often than those who don’t.

6. Company car drivers often exceed speed limits in order to get to appointments on time, are less likely to view speeding as risky and more likely to think that being on time is more important.

7. Company car drivers who drive high annual mileages for work are up to 50% more likely to crash than private motorists.

This is the Company’s position on speeding

The company expects all drivers on company business to:

1. Respect speed limits.

2. Never drive faster than road conditions safely allow.

3. Obey speed limits at all times (including variable limits and temporary limits at road works) and that persistent failure to do so will be treated as a serious matter.

4. Realise that good progress on the road does not depend on the inappropriate use of speed.

5. Know the speed limits on different types of road for the vehicles they use (table attached).

6. Look for speed limit signs, including repeater signs, and understand how to recognise 30mph roads which don’t have repeater signs – street lights usually mean there is a 30mph limit unless there are signs showing another limit.

7. Plan safer journeys by ensuring schedules and plans allow sufficient time for drivers to complete their journeys (include rest breaks and take account of foreseeable weather and traffic conditions) at safe speeds and without needing to exceed speed limits.

The company will review trends in speeding penalties if they occur to identify driving activities where further action to improve safety may be needed. All managers should lead by personal example and follow the guidance in this fact sheet, both in the way they drive themselves and in encouraging colleagues to drive safely.

National Speed Limits

Built-up
Areas

Elsewhere

Motorways

Single
carriageways
Dual
carriageways
Type of vehicle

MPH

MPH

MPH

MPH

 Cars and motorcycles
(including car derived vans up to 2 tonnes maximum laden weight)

30

60

70

70

 Cars towing caravans or trailers
(including car derived vans and motorcycles)

30

50

60

60

 Buses and coaches
(not exceeding 12 metres in overall length)

30

50

60

70

 Goods vehicles
(not exceeding 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight)

30

50

60

70+

 Goods vehicles
(exceeding 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight)

30

40*

50*

60

+ 60 if articulated or towing a trailer.Street lights usually mean that there is a 30 mph speed limit unless there are signs showing another limit.

* 12th August 2014 – Goods vehicles (exceeding 7.5 tonnes maximum laden weight) The Government has signalled its intention to increase the 40mph on single carriageways to 50mph and from 50mph to 60 mph on dual carriageways. The latter limit is to be put out for consultation to interested parties for six weeks.